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Heart Health

Professor Steve Nicholls discusses PAD with FIVEaa radio

The South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and CMAX have embarked on a world-leading study to improve the treatment of a common circulatory condition, Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and its associated leg pain, in partnership with Japanese company, I’rom Group.

Listen to Professor Steve Nicholls, Heart Health Theme Leader, discuss the PAD research and trial with Jade Robran on FIVEaa on Thursday, 27 April 2017. Audio courtesy of FIVEaa Adelaide.

WHO WE’RE LOOKING FOR

SAHMRI and CMAX are seeing 18 patients to participate in this study, who can meet the following main selection criteria: 

  • Male or female participants aged ≥ 40 years 
  •  Diagnosis of PAD secondary to atherosclerosis 
  • Claudication symptoms of stable severity for at least 3 months 
  • Able to undertake treadmill exercise
  • Do not have poorly controlled diabetes mellitus 
  • No history of CHF or presence of CHF as defined by modified Framingham criteria class II-IV 
  • Do not have uncontrolled hypertension, defined as ≥ 180 systolic or ≥ 90 diastolic mmHg 
  • Free from unstable angina within 3 months of screening 
  • Have not suffered from a TIA or stroke within 3 months prior to screening 

PLEASE CALL 1800 150 433 IF YOU THINK YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR THIS TRIAL.

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SAHMRI is located on the traditional lands of the Kaurna people.

The SAHMRI community acknowledges and pays respect to the Kaurna people as the traditional custodians of the Adelaide region. We also acknowledge the deep feelings of attachment and the relationship of the Kaurna people to their country. We pay our respects to the Kaurna peoples' ancestors and the living Kaurna people today.